genealogy

Fearless Females (Day 20): She’s A Brick House


[I know The Commodores sang a song by that name, back in 1977, but the title fits my situation.].

Brick walls are commonly used as barriers or fences marking the boundaries of one’s property, or as metaphors to describe the limits of one’s capabilities. They keep unwanted visitors out (for the most part), possessions that you treasure within and profile your lacking skillsets due to physical or social disabilities.

In genealogy, brick walls are stumbling blocks, situations regarding a particular ancestor that you cannot confirm or locate through the paper trails. It is like they just … disappeared. Or were conjured into existance at 30 years of age.

For me, a brickwall is a family of stumbling blocks, each brick representing an ancestor or collateral relative that I cannot find, or am uncertain I have found the proper documentation about them.

There are two women that create massive migraines for my genealogy research — No, no, no! MiLady and Mum are major distractions that hinder my genealogy research … BIG difference!

The first brickwall is Hannah (FIRKINS), a daughter of Mr. & Mrs. William FIRKINS.  Hannah married Isaac NEEDHAM.  In 1879 they had a daughter, Esther A. NEEDHAM, who would later marry Hamer HEMMINGWAY.

The other brickwall is Mary (JOPSON), who wed John COWARD.  In 1849, they had a daughter named Sarah Ann COWARD, who would later marry Thomas ATKINSON II, after having an illegitimate daughter five years earlier.

If the UK Census goes back far enough, I should be able to locate the families of these two ladies; and possibly figure out the names of their mothers … that would be nice, but there has been no luck.

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1 reply »

  1. Here’s a tip I read in Shelley Bishop’s last blog. Death certificates have the name of father and mother. If you looked for the death certificates of these ladies’ mothers, you might find the mothers’ fathers, and thus their mothers names . . . I think I’ve got that right. Shelley Bishop mentioned FamilySearch, too . . . you can find her blog under the twitter name @SenseofFamily

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